About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CSPAN 13
CNNW 6
CSPAN2 4
MSNBCW 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KCSM (PBS) 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
jointly sponsor the measure at the u.n. human rights council. north korea's not a member of the council. delegates approved the measure unanimously. the three members of the commission will look into north korea's network of political prisons. japan's ambassadors cited the abduction of nationals. >> japan strongly believes that a commission of inquiry to investigate such human rights violations from an independent and impartial standpoint will provide the council with concrete outcomes to help international community in addressing this situation. >> north korea's u.n. ambassador in geneva criticized the measure. >> those human rights abuses have totally nothing to do with the dpk. >> the u.n. special raconteur said north koreans face grave, widespread, and systematic violations of human rights. >>> people in china can be sent to re-education camps for up to four years of hard labor for even minor offenses. it's known as re-education through labor. there are believed to be more than 300 of these facilities around the country with tens of thousands of inmates. until recently, little was k
everything in the press that has been written, and they feel that the november trip to the u.n. was so successful that they are willing to go to the icc. when you say that israel may build this bottleneck area linking north and south, they say, fine. the more palestinians you talk to who believe that it is either final status or bust, and buss means the u.n., and not interested in any sort of coordinated unilateral agreement, it is a dirty word there, you are really seeing confidence. i personally hope the president in his stay over there is able to talk to the president over there and speak to them about the limitations of that strategy two could go to the icc. israelis say they're going to the icc. that could tie them up for years in legal proceedings. i do not see how any of this brings peace. i'm concerned about it. i'm also concerned about decision making, i'm concerned about the isolation of prime minister fayyat. the palestinian press does not report on his activities anymore. on the one hand, the good news is that more money has arrived lately. since obama is coming, of course
attack damaged a hotel and a u.n. truck. the temporarily mod some damascus based staff to beirut and cairo and has asked all other u.n. personnel in the country to work from home until further note. the fighting in syria, damascus, has escalated in recent months. meanwhile, a bomb attack reportedly injured a rebel leader who was one of the federal to call for the syrian people to rise up against the syrian president. activists say somebody put a bomb in his car, and whoever that somebody is it on the loose and they had to amputate the guy's right leg. in another blow to the rebels, the president of the council has quit. jonathan hunt is with us. the opposition seems to be in chaos in terms of civilian leadership. >> civilian and military. the founder of the free syrian army is the guy who has apparently suffered serious injuries, perhaps even losing a leg, in this car bomb attack. that is a major blow to the unity of the army itself. he has been seen generally as a very effective general. his effectiveness now is obviously going to be in question. on top of that, you have the res
specifically? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. the constructed in many ways. physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. after 10 years of war in iraq we find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john kerry's visit today, the tensions between the united states and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to t
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
possible, but necessary. even as the u.n. launched an investigation into reports that chemical weapons were used in syria last week. andrea mitchell, nbc news, amman. >>> and it was the kind of meeting not witnessed in modern times. a get-together in italy today between two men who have worn the title pope. pope francis paid a visit to his predecessor benedict xvi at castel gandolfo the papal retreat where benedict has retired. francis -- pope francis told benedict, we are brothers. the two men prayed together with the vatican spokesman calling it a moment of great communion in the church. >>> a well-known russian tycoon who amassed great wealth after the fall of the soviet union was found dead today in england. boris berezovsky was a close ally of former president boris yeltsin. in return for backing yeltsin he was able to buy former state assets at bargain prices. he also helped vladimir putin rise to power but later had a falling-out with putin and moved to england. the circumstances of his death were unclear. berezovsky was 67 years old. >>> back in this country the evidence appears to
. >> the obama administration saw assad as a reformer in their words. it backed the u.n. diplomacy and bet on moscow to play a productive role. none of this worked. >> netanyahu's intelligence director said it's clear that the chemical weapons were used in syria. the chairman of the house intelligence committee said he believes that chemical weapons were used by the regime as a caveat. >> i like the see forensic evidence. >> embassy shuttered for year hedged on the chemical weapons. >> i can't tell you what happened. i can tell you we have a large team of people working on it. >> the syrian regime lost control with turkey and iraq. when they visit on friday, they are bracing for the possibility that the civil war could spread there. >> ed henry traveling with the president in jerusalem. thank you. now to iran, both leaders made clear they do not intend to allow the republic to get nuclear weapons. chief washington correspondent james rosen reports tonight there seems to be differences. >> they are not conveying how much divides them. >> i am convinced that the president is determined to pr
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
, and unfortunately the increase in civilian casualties are going to be the price paid for that. heather: the u.n. now says that they are going to go in, they're going to investigate this. in fact, three separate occasions where chemical weapons have allegedly been used in syria. but what type of access will they get and how will we even be able to prove this? >> well, i'm skeptical about that to be sure. this is a rogue regime. assad will only do what is is in his interest and his singular focus is preservation of his regime and to stay in power so he will do nothing to undermine that. if he has to lie or deny with the u.n. inspectors he will certainly do it but the u.n. inspectors, if they're competent like the ones we had it iraq they will certainly know what assad is up to and be able to reveal he is not giving them the kind of access they should have. heather: finally, what the is greatest danger if in fact syria has the chemical weapons and they're using them? secondly, president obama said this would be a game-changer. those were his words if in fact it is proven chemical weapons are being used
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
, decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. who blame the people committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. insurgencies just that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. -- been closed. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
? some syrian rebels have been designated as foreign terrorist organizations. they have captured u.n. peacekeepers after being released later. the u.s. must take necessary precautions and due diligence. can you give us more information about the opposition? they are not just syrian national. who are far and fighters have the islamic militants from neighboring countries. post-asidevern in a syria? on weapons of mass destruction, are reports correct the syrian regime might possess up to 50 tons of weapons-grade nuclear materials in its stockpile? true, willports are the u.s. call for an emergency meeting to discuss this and if assad does not grant inspectors immediate access to all nuclear facilities and stockpiles so they can be protected, will the u.s. impose and mediate, comprehensive, and painful sanctions? will we do sell acting with the european union? lastly, on the countries that are aiding the brutality of regime, these countries continue to provide military assistance, weaponry, and they seek to further the illegal weapons program in supporting these foreign terrorist organiz
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
: you said that the u.n. has weighed in. >> the high commissioner for human rights has a special envoy which concluded that it violates international standards of human rights. each the u.n. doesn't get t. germany doesn't get it, the obama administration doesn't get t. i am hope that this sixth circuit will get it right. >> shannon: please, keep us updated. >> i will. thank you very much. >> shannon: who can fob get the tragedy story about the sinkhole that swallowed a man sleeping in his bedroom. there is another sinkhole a mile away that has florida residents on edge. still to come... fair and balanced and a feisty debate about whether the union workers in michigan have a right to be mad. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. [ construction sounds ] ♪ [ watch ticking ] [ engine revs ] come in. ♪ got the coffee. that was fast. we're outta here. ♪ [ engine revs ]
know that the u.n. is moving forward on investigation of exactly what happened. we're monitoring the situation ourselves. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective because once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to stop and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. >> gregg: the general is retired four-star general and fox news military analyst. pleasure to see you. thanks so much. you know, the rebels to overthrow assad desperately need weapons but they need intel. they have to know where the troop movements are. are they getting it in some way? >> they are finally starting to get it from us. i am delighted to see the increased support for the rebels. they are providing intelligence to them. they are downloading from satellite imagery and listening to what the syrian military is doing on the ground. we have enormous eavesdropping capability and we have human intelligence in terms of what is taking place. now that is bees funneled into some of the rebels, not all of t
to go to the u.n. security council. but that doesn't really stop it from continuing or escalating. and that's what i think the president's grappling with. >> you do have a very different response, though, from those on congressional intelligence committees who yesterday were saying there is a high probability that chemicals were used from the obama administration you hear much more of a neutral message. >> that's right, anderson. and the two people we heard in congress are greater among equals, let's say. it's the chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers, and the chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee, dianne feinstein. they admitted that they had been briefed. this isn't their opinion. and that's an awkward fact for the obama administration. the president is in the region, we're hearing now from officials that it's going to take a couple of days for them to determine whether or not a chemical weapon is used. and let's be honest. by then, president obama will be out of the region, safely back here and in a better position to make a decision. >> john, you'
the issue of chemical weapons. we have called for and we know that the u.n. is now moving forward on investigation of exactly what happened. we're monitoring the situation ourselves. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to stop and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. so we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody in the region and do everything we can to bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out of a leader who has lost all legitimacy because he's willing to slaughter his own people. and i'm confident assad will go. it's not a question of if, it's when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what's the aftermath of that. and how does that work in a way that actually serves the syrian people. and by the way, serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations because one of the things we know is happening in
. we have called for and we know that the u.n. is moving forward on investigation of what happened. we're monitoring the situation ourselves. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game-changer from our perspective. because once you let that situation spin out of control, it's very hard to stop and can have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody in the region and do everything we can to bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out of a leader who has lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. and i'm confident that assad will go, it's not a question of if, it's when. and so part of what we have to spend a lot of time thinking about is what's the aftermath of that. and how does that work in a way that actually serves the syrian people. and by the way, serves the syrian people from all walks of life. from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know is happening in this region is that if we fail to c
state and a viable independent palestinian state. >> but israel is already a state. it is u.n. recognized. it is a state. the two-state solution presumes that israel isn't already a state. and abbas has written that he will never recognize israel's sovereignty. and creating a two states will only give them cause to internationalize a legal conflict with israel. >> the reality as we know it now, this is not, i'm not really debating this particular question. it is israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu who does not truly accept what we call a settlement based on a two-state solution. an independent, viable state. for the palestinians, in the west bank and gaza and occupied east jerusalem in a viable independent israeli state in the very heart of the arab world. you're absolutely correct. israel is an independent state. the question to you and to many israelis, israel must embed itself in its environment. israel must be integrated into the region as a good citizen as long as the palestinians, and i'm both as a scholar of the middle east and also as an american. as long as the
change in iraq. you know, in the glass one-quarter full side, they had elections. the u.n. validated the results. they weren't fraudulent. they were a lot more honest than they were in afghanistan. they have a parliament. the council of representatives. they passed a budget recently. there is political life in iraq. it's--y. it's-- whatever malikis an authoritarian figure but he's nothing like a saddam by anybody's estimation. so i just-- while there are reasons to be concerned in iraq and reasons to worry about the future, i don't think we should paint an entirely dark picture. and i think if you asked iraqis you'd get different perspectives. if you asked the kurds, i think they're glad there was the invasion. they have more autonomy than they've ever had before, having relations with the turks. if you ask the shi'a, they were empowered but there are probably-- despite the fact they're empowered, there are elements that resent the americans. resent the invasion because they were lodged from the top of the pyramid but theyt miss the americans, many of them, because we're not there in
and soil to a u.n. team along with rocket debris. secretary of state john kerry has strong words for iraq's prime minister. do something to stop the flights of iranian weapons to syria. the visit to bag dad comes amid growing concern over iraq's role in the syrian conflict. iraqi officials deny allowing the transfer of weapons through iraqi air space to president al assad's regime. in england police say a full inquiry is underway into the mysterious death of the russian boris berezovsky. outspoken critic of putin calling for his overthrow. berezovsky was found dead in his mansion near london where he lived in exile. he was a target of an assassination attempt in russia in 1994. he was found wounded and his driver killed when a car bomb exploded. >>> hundreds turned out at the karachi airport to welcome home former pakistani president pervez musharraf. musharraf fled the country as a dictator. but after four years of self-imposed exile he arrives back in pakistan today. he said he came back to save his country. and plan to run for office again. >> where are those people now that said i wou
at fox news tot dom. -- foxnews.com. thank you, joel. martha: the u.n. chief ban ki-moon is saying the u.n. will launch an investigation whether or not chemical weapons were used in syria. both sides, the rebels and the syrian government have accused the other of using chemical weapons on the ground in syria. president obama said the investigation is ongoing and we'll wait to see what the finding is before taking action but clearly it could be a red line if indeed those weapons were used. >>> heart break for the u.s. marine corps. seven servicemembers killed in an explosion during a training exercise. what we now know about what happened. we'll be right back. oh this is lame, investors could lose tens of thousands of dollars on their 401(k) to hidden fees. is that what you're looking for, like a hidden fee in your giant mom bag? maybe i have them... oh that's right i don't because i rolled my account over to e-trade where... woah. okay... they don't have hidden fees... hey fern. the junkrawer? why would they... is that my gerbil? you said he moved to a tiny farm. that's it, i'm running awa
are not seeing any of it the way the u.n. rules work. as long as the u.n. is recognizing the assad government that aid is not allowed to go into opposition territory which is where most of the refugees are so a whole calderon of issues. >> changing topics just a bit. some things only happen every four years, presidential elections and olympics and leap years. this weekend the senate did something it hadn't done in more than 1,400 days. they actually passed a budget. the all-night session stretched from thursday night to saturday. keystone lpipeline. they did pass the budget although by a margin of just one vote. >> the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average 35 amendments, we have done 70, twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> i know everyone is exhausted and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> not a single republican supported the plan. one of the finest days in the history of the senate. four democrat
the planes are delivering humanitarian aid but the u.n. wants them stop for inspections in iraq before they continue to syria, and some see this is part of an american failure to suspectfully confront iran. >> fundamentally this is not a syria problem. this is an iran problem. what has impeded the administration's policy for the last two years since the conflict in syria began is an unwillingness to take on iran. that's the source of the trouble. that's where the key support for the assad regime comes from. >> there is no immediate indicate iraq will crackdown on the iranian flights. >>heather: steve, thank you from washington, dc. >> syria's western-backed opposition is reportedly in disarray after the president resigned early today in a surprise announcement saying he was frustrated with the international community and the opposition body itself. analysts say the chaos threatens to undermine the group's bid to unite forces against president assad and could also hamper support from the united states and other countries. >>heather: despite death threats, former pakistani president is b
the consumer. >> reporter: dramatic reductions came not through carbon tax or u.n. mandate, private sector forces and technologies greens oppose. >> process of fracking natural gas creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: so they oppose high i can fracturing because the more natural gas, lower the price. longer it would take before wind and solar replace fossil fuels and are cost competitive. back to you. heather: william la jeunesse, live for us, thank you. bill: the spring season pull ad houdini. where did it go? a a major snow storm is battling the midwest. that is look at white stuff throughout the country. tough going out there. it was supposed to be spring right? heather: old man winter has not given up. >> all i heard was we would have snow. i didn't hear how much we were getting. this is quite a lot. >> is this frustrating. this is march or spring. >> every year seems like it is like this. so just have to relax. bill: here we go on the 25th of march. snow records have been shattered, yet another spring storm burying parts of the country and taking its
reductions came not because of a carbon tax or a u.n. mandate but market forces and private sector technologies greens oppose. >> the process of fracking natural gas is, creates a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. >> reporter: greens also oppose fracking because it does mean more natural gas and lower prices. and that of course makes wind and solar more expensive, jon. you will continue to see the fight over fracking, about carbon taxes and subsidies for wind and solar. back to you. jon: william la jeunesse. good explanation there. thank you. jenna: your chances weren't that great of winning the fourth biggest jackpot in powerball history but somebody out there beat those 175 to 1 odds. how about that? now we're getting some word about where the winning ticket was sold. we'll have those breaking details for you up ahead. >>> the new health care law turns three years old over the weekend. what do we know about its true costs and requirements for everyday americans? we'll take a closer look ahead. [ male announcer ] every famous curve has an equally thrilling, lesser-kn
before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got it wrong, everybody did which means somebody in our society -- and it ends up being the media -- has to stand up and say let's think about this a little bit rather than rush into a war. we are now at a point, jon, where an american president can determine when the united states goes to war, whether the congress approves of it or not. we don't deal with deck la rightses -- declarations of war any longer. and so at this particular point, who other than the media ought to stand up and say, wait a minute, let'
involvement, there would have to be a u.n. security council resolution regional agreement and an agreement among the 28 patients. so within nato, what we are focused on is defending now with syria. and we would move patriot missiles down to do that. in terms of what else is happening in an individual nation by nation basis, there is a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, etc. it is moving individually, but it has not yet come into nato as an overall nato type of approach. it is focused, planning, being prepared. but the movement at the moment is in the individual national way. >> does that include some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of serious air defense? >> yes. >> thank you. >> senator? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i want to get some clarification. i am disturbed about the answers that you just gave. i know that general jacoby, that would've been better asked. however, you are responsible for the homeland. when we talk about the capability of iran, we talk about both western europe and the
. it hasn't yet reached the red line that i had described in my speech at the u.n. they're getting closer. and the question of manufacturing the weapon is a different thing. the president said correctly we have on these issues that are a little arcane, they sound a little detailed to you, but on these matters, we share information and we have a common assessment. we have a common assessment. and in any case, iran gets to an immunity zone when they get through the enrichment process in our view, in our view. and whatever time is left, there is not a lot of time. and every day that passes diminishes it. but we do have a common assessment on these schedules, on intelligence. we share that intelligence and don't have any argument about it. i think it is important to state that clearly. i think that people should get to know president obama the way i've gotten to know. and i think you've heard something that is very meaningful. it may have escaped you. but it hasn't escaped me. and that is the president announced that in addition to all the aid that his administration's provided, including iro
weapons. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. he will be replaced. it is not a question of if. it is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to create a model in the arab world in which peop
done solely for security reasons after a number of mortar shells reigned down the hotel housing u.n. staff. most employees are being temporarily relocated to buy route and cairo. the move comes as violence rages across the region. a top rebel was wounded and dozens of new deaths being reported just today. >>> it was a sour day on wall street with stocks closing lower amid worries a bailout deal struck in cyprus could set a precedent for other debt-strapped eurozone nations. the s&p, dow can jones and nasdaq all ended down. cyprus struck a deal with european negotiators earlier today, which means big losses at account holders at bankses. >>> it may be spring, but, oh, boy, many parts of the country, including right here in washington, are getting a heavy dose of winter. a powerful storm is packing in some cases historic amounts of snow and blustery winds across the midwest, mid-atlantic, and southern states. winter storm warnings were posted today from new jersey down to north carolina and tennessee, prompting hundreds of flight cancellations and delays. >>> and serious fireworks on
at the u.n. general assembly where we can never forget those images of prime minister netanyahu holding up a photograph of the bomb, and drawing that red line. also all of the discussion around him not being able to get that meeting with the president while he was in the united states now that he's got a warm welcome. let's let our viewers listen in a little bit more if we can to this. ♪ >> these are live pictures of a historic moment, president obama making his first visit to israel as president of the united states there. he is with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. a historic trip. it's also a very important trip as there are many items on the agenda, including the crisis in syria that's happening, and, you know, the chemical weapons, the suggestion of chemical weapons being used against the people in aleppo. it's apacked agenda for the president. our question was whether or not he would be addressing the situation in syria. >> it's been unclear whether or not the president was going to make official remarks here, right as he touched down or not. we know that he will view the iron do
, the decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq nd those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. hey blame the people who committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. these are not just insurgencies that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
and the european union jointly sponsored the measure at the u.n. human rights counsel. north korea is not a member of the council. dell gats approved the measure unanimously. they were looking toward north korea's network of prisons. they cited the abduction of nationals. in the 1970s and '80s. >> gentleman than strongly believes that a commission of inquiry to investigate such human rights violations from an independent and impartial standpoint will provide the council with concrete outcomes which will guide the international community in addressing the situation. >> north korea's u.n. ambassador in geneva criticized the measure. >> seeking the political -- of the hostile forces those human rights abuses have totally nothing to do with -- >> the u.n. has said north korean face grave, wide spread and systematic violations of human rights. >>> syrian president assad is vowing revenge on the people he blames for a suicide bombing. the explosion killed 49 people, including a religious leader who was a strong supporter of the assad government. the bomber blew himself up atmos being in the capital of d
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)